Collaboration & Motivation While WFH

Tuesday, August 4th, 2020|Comments Off on Collaboration & Motivation While WFH

As we continue to navigate the ‘work from home’ sphere, one that might be new for many of us, we must maintain clear communication with other members of our team. Although it may feel impersonal to communicate through a screen, the technology at our fingertips and the resources it provides allows us to communicate intuitively and efficiently, avoiding any misunderstandings that arise when we cannot meet in person. 

Open communication: As is often the problem with technologically-mediated communication, the meaning of something can be lost or misconstrued. Therefore, open communication is now more important than ever. This can mean anything from being clear about expectations for a certain project to outlining deadlines and expressing obstacles that crop up along the way. Knowing what your team needs from you, and being honest about your ability to fulfill that need allows for more effective collaboration.  Collaboration tools such as Trello, Jira, or Basecamp come in handy to review progress and set expectations.  

Keep in touch with team members: There are many efficient ways to keep your team accountable when managing a WFH group. For example, programs like Slack or Monday.com help communicate with teams at-large, manage tasks, and organize multiple projects occurring at once. Slack, for example, allows you to communicate with single members of your team or specific groups of people working on certain tasks. It also allows you to create ‘channels’ for certain projects, where different members can post documents, raise questions, or provide updates. When possible, hop on a quick Zoom video call to connect, or use Loom to record an explainer video.

Time management: Managing one’s time while working from home can be increasingly challenging when it feels like work-life and home-life are merging into one without clearly defined boundaries. However, it is important to set priorities for oneself to manage tasks efficiently. To set priorities, it is crucial to understand the bigger picture or the larger goal your team has. This is yet another reason why clear communication is so important. By understanding what it is your team is trying to achieve, you can prioritize your tasks to efficiently contribute to that end goal. 

Self-motivation: As many of us have adapted to the WFH lifestyle, there has been some concern about keeping motivated and on task when working from home. Setting clear expectations and a work-life-home-life separation is imperative for holding ourselves accountable for the work that must be completed. This begins with overcoming procrastination

Home-life places obstacles in the way of productivity–children, pets, making dinner, laundry, cleaning random cabinets– allowing procrastination to be a constant temptation. One way to stop procrastinating is to simply remove distractions. For example, if your phone distracts you, turn it off and place it in a random drawer in your house, thereby requiring a greater amount of energy to reach it, making it less of a distraction. You can also mitigate the procrastination temptation by using reward-based motivation. For example, tell yourself that after you finish your project you will be able to use your phone again. Giving yourself a reward after each task you complete will foster greater motivation to do so. 

We are all in this together and knowing how to function within our “new normal” will allow us to continue progressing forward even when our world has been put on pause. 

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 566th issue of our a.blog

3 New Normal Job Search Strategies

Tuesday, July 21st, 2020|Comments Off on 3 New Normal Job Search Strategies

These unprecedented times require applicants to be more creative in utilizing new networking channels and better job search strategies to connect with hiring managers and companies.

The first step is to look at the industry and vertical you are interested in to find out if this particular industry has been impacted positively or negatively by the pandemic. Then, determine whether that industry is growing or shrinking its current workforce.

Once you’ve set you’re your parameters, the following channels and resources can be beneficial to learn more about that industry or a specific company, its culture, and the leadership team before you apply. You may also make some valuable connections to help you directly apply to a hiring manager.

Slack

There are thousands of Slack communities that are focused on specific industries or interest groups. Hone in on your specific skill set or target industry and network there. Solfie is a great resource to help you find the right group for you. For example, if you are a marketing candidate or an SEO specialist a resource such as Ahref’s Slack channel can help with both upskilling as well as networking.

Podcasts

Special interest podcasts are a great place to get introduced to new companies and influencers within those companies.   There are many design podcasts for freelancers and design professionals that include tips and best practices. Debbie Millman’s podcast Design Matters is a top podcast on design.

Additional design podcasts can be found here. Our own Artisan podcast with a focus on creativity, inspiration, and determination is another great resource to hear from creatives on how they got their start and what keeps them going and growing.

Social Media

Follow thought leaders, influencers, and companies you are interested in on Twitter. This will give you an opportunity to create conversations and learn more about the philosophies and methodologies of companies who are game-changers in their verticals.

LinkedIn is a powerful tool for showcasing your candidacy as well as searching for and learning about job openings. LinkedIn has a weekly article featuring hiring activity in various industries. The benefit of LinkedIn is that you can actively join industry groups and network, respond to and follow thought leaders within your circle of interest, get recommendations, and update your profile and availability.

As you update your LinkedIn profile, make sure you upload your resume to other design portfolio sites and job boards as well. Also check out our newly launched Inspiring Hiring portal where you can create a profile, upload your resume, record a video of your accomplishments and thought process, and share your core values with hiring managers.

The best approach in this climate is a multi-pronged approach.   Leave the guesswork and haphazard approach to your competition—and plan your success to stand out from the crowd.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 565th issue of our a.blog.

How to Discover Your Core Values

Tuesday, July 7th, 2020|Comments Off on How to Discover Your Core Values

“Our values are at our core, and are an expression of how we act every day.”

Warren Rustand.

Lately, I’ve been reflecting a lot on my core values, how I define them, and how I remain true to them.

Warren Rustand, a successful entrepreneur and the Dean of Leadership for The Entrepreneurs’ Organization, says our values carry us through good and bad times. “Our values are everything we do, our acts, and behaviors. It tells people what we actually value, they define our character, they create and compose our integrity.”

Steven Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People defines these as our three moments of truth:

  • Discovery of our values. We realize what our core beliefs and values really are.
  • Discovery of what we stand for when we commit to those values.
  • The moment we act on those core beliefs and values.

In the corporate world, it is common-place that companies define and share their core values and display them in their offices, on their website where customers, employees, and candidates can see them.

We did the same at Artisan Creative and I’m proud that our a.team helped articulate ours after several conversations together. They are Accountability, Agility, Trust, Communication, and Enthusiasm. These are the core values we embrace every day, and how we conduct ourselves in business year over year.

If companies take the time to discover and articulate their core values, why don’t we do this for ourselves? For our families? How can we better share what we stand for and what our values are to others and to our children?

It’s often during difficult times that we need to evaluate what is important to us. Today, with one of the highest unemployment rates on record, many are going through challenging times. Candidates are evaluating and contemplating what their next step can be, and what type of company they want to work for. I’ve heard from many who no longer want to commute long hours, no longer want to work for a company without a purpose, no longer want to travel just for work. They no longer want to work for someone whose values don’t align with theirs.

We live our lives by a certain internal compass, a moral code, and although many times we may not know how to articulate these actions as values, it is in challenging times that we can rely on them.

So as we are in this time of reflection, it’s important to determine and articulate our own personal core values and share them with one another.

Here are three steps to help define yours. This is a process of putting together seemingly disparate puzzle pieces until finally, an image emerges. It requires patience, thoughtfulness, and reflection.

Write down your answers to the following questions:

Reflect back to a time when you were faced with an important decision and ask:

  • How did I behave?
  • How did I feel?
  • What did I want?
  • What was important to me?
  • What was I willing to stand for?
  • What did I NOT stand for?
  • What was my non-negotiable?

Reflect back to a time when you were faced with a challenge in your life and ask:

  • How did I behave?
  • How did I feel?
  • What did I want?
  • What was important to me?
  • What was I willing to stand for?
  • What did l I NOT stand for?
  • What was my non-negotiable?

Reflect back to a time when someone needed your help:

  • How did I behave?
  • How did I feel?
  • What did I want?
  • What was important to me?
  • What was I willing to stand for?
  • What did I NOT stand for?
  • What was my non-negotiable?

Additional questions to bring clarity:

  • How do my friends describe me?
  • What gives me joy?
  • What brings meaning to my life?

Once you’ve answered all the questions, look for common themes, phrases, and words.

Circle those words, or search for other words that resonate with you.

What emerges? Who emerges from those words? Do they resonate with you, and are they who you are at your core?

Once you know them, share this with others. Then, add them to your website and your resume. Let potential employers and employees know how you live by these values.

In the words of Gandhi, “Your beliefs become your thoughts, Your thoughts become your words, Your words become your actions,
Your actions become your habits, Your habits become your values, Your values become your destiny.”
 

Please connect if you are looking for your next opportunity or your next hire.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 564th issue of our a.blog.

5 Steps to Building Resilience in Your Job Search

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2020|Comments Off on 5 Steps to Building Resilience in Your Job Search

If you’ve recently lost a job or are getting frustrated with the long application or interview cycles, a key attribute that will help you stay in the game is resilience. Studies have shown, that with the right habits and mindset, you can develop a more resilient approach to your job search. Here’s how to do it:

1. Reflect, Then Keep Moving

In the aftermath of a job loss or during a difficult job search, it is normal to experience sadness, anger, and loss. Acknowledging these feelings is the best way to move through and continue on. Avoid getting stuck in the past, learn from your previous experience, develop a positive mindset, and become more conscious of new opportunities and things to be grateful for.

2. Take Stock of Yourself

Now is the time to be a good friend to yourself and emphasize your strongest qualities. Gather evidence of your past achievements, think about the things you love to do and are best at, and do some research to discover what new avenues may be open to you in a changing marketplace. If you haven’t updated your online portfolio or your LinkedIn profile in a while, make sure they showcase your best work in a way that’s exciting and relevant. (This may make you feel more optimistic and become more resilient, too.)

3. Try New Things

A sudden job loss or a long job search can give you the needed time to build new skills or to experiment with new hobbies and interests. If you read books and articles about subjects you want to learn about, attend virtual events that look interesting to you, and get out of your comfort zone, you may find yourself drawn to fresh subjects and opportunities you didn’t notice before. Be yourself, make connections, and grow your grit. New experiences can help you put things in perspective and develop a more broad-minded outlook, which is powerful for building resilience.

Masterclass, Udemy, Creative Live, or General Assembly are great places to brush up on your skills or develop new ones.

4. Express Gratitude

Our inherent negativity bias makes it easier to dwell on the negative and ignore the positive. To become more resilient, refocus your mindset and go overboard with positivity for a while. When you make a daily gratitude list, or simply remind yourself to look for the silver lining in situations, you train your brain to notice the good things around you, which will make it easier to spot your next big opportunities.

5. Reach Out

Being independent doesn’t mean being alone. Your peers, mentors, and friends will understand what you’re going through, and many will be eager to help if you give them a chance to do so. Join online platforms, browse groups on Linkedin, Groupspace, or Creative Mornings can connect with your other likeminded individuals for collaboration, connection, and communication.

You can start by contacting Artisan Creative. We have experience helping creative professionals connect with amazing companies and tune into new opportunities in a changing world of work. Let’s keep the conversation going!

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 563rd issue of the a.blog.

A message from Artisan Creative

Saturday, June 6th, 2020|Comments Off on A message from Artisan Creative

No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate. And if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the heart than its opposite.” 
– Nelson Mandela

To our creative community, talent, clients and our a.team,

As an immigrant and a female business owner, having an equal voice– and giving an equal voice–has been a personal motto for years. We have built Artisan Creative on diversity and inclusivity and we’re proud that our team has always been representative of many races and ethnicities.

Artisan Creative stands for equality, inclusivity, and fairness with a core mission to create relationships based on trust.

We firmly believe diversity and inclusion are the foundations of a just and fair society that extend to the business community. We stand with those in the fight against racism, oppression, and injustice. Our hearts are with those who have been negatively affected by today’s political, social, and business climate.

We recognize there is more work to be done on many fronts and we commit to learning, engaging, and to being part of a new narrative. To create meaningful change we must make our collective voices heard loud and strong.

To further support the need for justice and to support organizations that fight for change, we have donated to The Innocence Project that exonerates the wrongly convicted through DNA testing, and reforms the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice.

Additional Opportunities to Donate or Volunteer are below: 

George Floyd Memorial Fund

Black Lives Matter

www.blackgirlscode.com  STEM education, Technology training for girls, diversity learning, Social Entrepreneurship in Oakland, CA

Empowher is committed to empowering girls and young women in marginalized communities by helping them gain the skills necessary through education, training, and mentorship to become confident, college, and career-ready.

Learning

Obama Foundation

Barak Obama’s Medium article

Opal Tometi

Codeswitch

 

Together we can create change,

Katty Douraghy
President

Artisan Creative

The Power of Gratitude

Tuesday, May 26th, 2020|Comments Off on The Power of Gratitude

“Today I choose to live with gratitude for the love that fills my heart, the peace that rests within my spirit, and the voice of hope that says all things are possible.” –  Anonymous

It’s easy to be grateful when things are going well. We count our blessings, and express gratitude for all the good we have. It takes effort when things are not.

In those moments when life challenges us, it becomes even more important to count the good that is still around us, even though we may not be fully aware of it.

Martin Seligman, an American psychologist, and the founder of positive psychology says “When we take time to notice the things that go right – it means we’re getting a lot of little rewards throughout the day”.

It’s a choice to take time every day to notice the beauty around us, things that are right with the world, even in the midst of a pandemic, even in the midst of one of the highest unemployment rates in our history.

What if amongst these hardships we could seek the good and express our gratitude for it, and shift our mindset towards happiness?

Warren Rustand, the Dean of Leadership at the Entrepreneur’ Organization (EO), a long time friend and mentor shared his 10-10-10 morning routine with me a few years back. He starts each day with 10 minutes of reading positive writings from a selection of well-known books, followed by 10 minutes of thinking positive thoughts and ending with10 minutes of journaling about gratitude.

Based on this learning, I personally have been using the Day One app to write down my own daily gratitudes. When personal tragedy struck a few years ago and I lost several family members over a short time due to illness, it was the gratitude journal that helped me heal. Even in the darkest of times, I could be grateful for the time we had together, grateful for the memories I was left with, grateful for the lessons they had taught me. Although I could not change the outcome of their illness, I could change my mindset.

David Steindl-Rast in his widely viewed Tedtalk talks about the connection between being grateful and being happy.   He says we can be grateful in every given moment.

I’ve chosen to embrace the power of gratitude and have shared these learnings with my team here at Artisan Creative. We’ve started a gratitude Slack channel and each day share them with each other.

So today, at the start of our 10th week of Safer at Home I’m hoping you’ll also join me in expressing gratitude for all that you have.

This week my ten are:

  • Grateful for health
  • Grateful for weekly family zoom calls with family across the world
  • Grateful for my pets and spending so much time with them at home
  • Grateful for expanding my culinary skills
  • Grateful for the jacarandas that paint LA a beautiful purple this time of the year
  • Grateful for early morning walks in our neighborhood
  • Grateful for the Artisan Creative team helping candidates who are looking for work
  • Grateful for Yoga with Adriene!
  • Grateful Southern California beaches are open again
  • Grateful to you for reading this.

Will you please share yours?

with gratitude,
Katty

We hope you’ve enjoyed our 561st issue of our a.blog.

3 Tips to Navigate Your Job Search

Tuesday, May 12th, 2020|Comments Off on 3 Tips to Navigate Your Job Search

The current massive unemployment rates have many talented candidates out of work and searching for new opportunities. Additionally, the impact of stay-at-home measures is clearly exasperating the job search efforts for many.

As we navigate these unchartered waters and contemplate what the next version of what “work” is going to mean, it becomes important to take a moment and reflect. Julio Vincent Gambuto calls this moment “The Great Pause”.

We are indeed in a (prolonged) moment of pause—which is not comfortable.  However, since we are unable to rewind and go back to what once was, we can be more fully present and work on evaluating the future and possibilities that we can create.

To do so, here are three tips on how to evaluate what you really want to do next.

Define your Core Values

Take the needed time to think about what you want to do next and how that may align with your core values and purpose. If you haven’t had a chance to define your core values yet, now is a good time to partake in core values or visioning exercises to discover what is important to you.

Focus on Upskilling

As you re-imagine what that future of work will be for you, now is also a great opportunity to upskill. Many well-known universities around the world are offering free online classes. If you’ve been thinking of pivoting into other fields such as UX or product design, now is your chance. Ideo offers Design Thinking classes, as well as Leadership and Innovation classes. Masterclass is another great resource to try out a new hobby, learn something new, or write the story you’ve always wanted to tell.

Give Back

Volunteering is a great way to keep busy, make new connections in a new field, and help others in need. If you’ve always wanted to help out a non-profit what better time to share your expertise? It also provides a great opportunity to enhance your resume. More importantly, giving back is a great mood enhancer as it boosts oxytocin levels by creating levels of engagement, productivity, and usefulness which leads to gratitude.

We wish you the best as you embark on your job search.  For additional tips on resume writing and interviewing please check our a.blog. We hope you’ve enjoyed our 560th issue.

20 Remote Meeting Best Practices

Tuesday, April 28th, 2020|Comments Off on 20 Remote Meeting Best Practices

By staying safe at home, and seeing nearly all interviews and meetings transitioning online, we wanted to share twenty remote meetings best practices we’ve learned over the past ten years of working exclusively as a remote team.

Whether you are having ongoing daily team huddles, interviewing for a new opportunity, meeting a client or prospect via video for the first time, it’s important to keep the following pointers top of mind:

Equipment

  1. Ensure your device and headphones are fully charged or plugged in prior to your meeting.
  2. Whether you are Zooming, using Facetime, Google Hangouts, or another tool, test your device’s audio and video connections before the actual meeting.
  3. Look right at the camera when you speak. If you only look at the screen itself it’ll appear as if you’re not making eye contact with the attendees.
  4. With everyone working from home, combined with homeschooling for many others, ensure that you are in a quiet place with enough wifi bandwidth.
  5. Adjust your device screen to ensure your head and shoulders appear in the frame – don’t get too close or move too far away from the camera.
  6. Be stationary and mount any handheld devices such as your mobile phone or iPad so you aren’t “traveling” with your device. It’s distracting and disrespectful.

Environment

  1. Let your family or roommate know you’ll be on camera to avoid unexpected noise or interruptions.
  2. Practice your on-screen time and record yourself if possible.
  3. Adjust the lighting so your face is front-lit without any shadows.
  4. Keep an eye on your posture. Adjust your lighting as needed.
  5. Pay attention to your surroundings—especially your background. Select a clean, neutral, and distraction-free backdrop like a wall, a screen, or a panel of curtains. Close closet doors, make your bed and clean the clutter. If you are unable to do so, use zoom’s virtual backgrounds to create a branded look. You can find many examples on Canva.
  6. If you are presenting or screen sharing, make certain you have a clean, uncluttered desktop and if needed, change your desktop wallpaper to something creative and professional.

Engagement

  1. Confirm time zones in case you are meeting with someone in another state or country.
  2. Speak clearly and succinctly. Use your voice, tone, and body language to communicate and connect. Use modified hand gestures as needed or gently lean in when making a point.
  3. There can be a slight delay in communication, so be mindful not to talk over the other person.
  4. Mute when not speaking (just remember to un-mute when it’s your turn to talk).
  5. Dress and groom as if you are meeting in person. Working from home still requires being professional.
  6. If in a larger gathering, become familiar with layout views so you can fully engage with everyone.
  7. If you are making a pitch or presenting your work, have your portfolio or presentation loaded on your desktop to screen share as needed.  Practice Zoom’s presentation tools such as whiteboard, and annotation to create a bigger impact on your audience.
  8. Be friendly and smile while talking. It lifts and warms your voice, which helps you to connect with the group.

In 2009, we decided that the benefits of a successful remote environment outweighed the stresses of the daily commute. We love it and firmly believe in the life/work integration that being a remote company provides our team. If working in a remote setting is new for you, please check out this video and our additional blogs on the subject matter.

WE hope you’ve enjoyed the 559th issue of our a.blog

When Zoom Became A Verb

Tuesday, April 14th, 2020|Comments Off on When Zoom Became A Verb

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.”

― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

These are indeed interesting times we live in—the best and the worst woven into the fabric of our lives and businesses.

The best, because this is the most family time many of us have had together. The best because we are cooking more, walking more, calling our friends more, playing board games more, enjoying the simple things in life more.

And of course, the worst of times, because our world is in pain. Our friends’ and families’ health and livelihood have been severely impacted.

We live in a time when Zoom has become a verb. I zoomed with my family last weekend and will be zooming with a friend for her birthday next week. We see many loved ones and share their pain and their joy across our digital devices. Birthday parties, weddings, and even funerals are now zoomable.

Our team has been zooming for several years. We went remote as a company in 2009 when the last economic downturn impacted us, and we haven’t looked back since. We believe once many clients and talent experience how well a remote team can function it will shift many perspectives as well as work patterns.

I’d love to share with you a few learnings from my team, as well as from several of our freelance talent about best practices for keeping accountable, organized and motivated while working remotely. Being solo does not mean being in a silo!

 

  1. Maintain your schedule– Keep the same work hours you had when you were in the office, and keep a balanced scheduled at home before and after work. Having a consistent schedule helps set boundaries and creates uniformity.
  2. Designate a specific place for work(not your bed, not the couch)  If you don’t have a designated home office, create a space where you can be working ergonomically. Where possible have a set area to work that can help maintain routine and organization.
  3. Work with a headset– Be good to your neck and have your hands free. You can type and take notes easier for additional productivity.
  4. Be in a work mindset. If you’re not used to working at home, don’t get distracted with home chores. Schedule times for those chores as you would if you were out.
  5. Take breaks & Stretch to stay mentally focused and positive
  6. Stay connected with your team as if you were physically at the office.
  7. Communicate & Collaborate. Use technology to bridge the gap of distance. Check-in with co-workers and clients often.
  8. Work your calendar! Keep productive and stay on task. Make lists, set goals, track your time. Apps like Pomodoro or Toggl can help.
  9. Have fun while you work. Play music, have your pet with you, cook an amazing lunch.
  10. Be Grateful. It’s a unique opportunity to work from home and not have to commute.

 

If you need additional best practices on managing a remote team, check out our brief video  ” A Remote Team Needs TLC”

“I typically get to work at 10 am, so while at home I start working at 10 am too. Keeping my morning routine (for me that’s meditating, moving my body, and making coffee) helps. The days when I start working right when I wake up are the days when I feel more anxious and restless.”

~ UI/UX designer Joni

Know that your employer trusts you enough to let you work remotely and that is something that should not be taken lightly.

~ Artisan Creative Account Manager, Margaret

When you prepare dinner, make extra. It’s nice to have something prepared for lunch.

~ Presentation Designer, Karen

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 558th issue of our a.blog.

Margaret Jung’s 25th year with Artisan Creative

Tuesday, March 31st, 2020|Comments Off on Margaret Jung’s 25th year with Artisan Creative

This month marks a momentous occasion at Artisan Creative where we celebrate our senior account manager, Margaret Jung’s 25th year with our company. 

In this day and age, it’s extremely rare to find such continued loyalty and passion; a quarter of a century is quite the feat. 

For those of you who have been fortunate to meet Margaret, know that she enters every room with the biggest smile, the loudest hello, and usually with a handful of cupcakes (every time, without fail, they are always from Dots Cupcakes).

Working for a company whose values are aligned with hers, the opportunity to create a difference in people’s lives and to build long-lasting relationships is what motivates her. Her energy, enthusiasm, and drive come down to one phrase: creating relationships based on trust.

She is a consummate business development professional, highly knowledgeable in the world of creative and marketing recruitment, and has a first-rate understanding of the design marketplace.

We had an opportunity to sit down with Margaret and have a conversation about the past 25 years and the lessons learned to stay strong all these years. 

Margaret believes we must:

  1. Stay positive 
  2. Be open to change
  3. Be realistic
  4. Work with and hire the right people–it goes a long way
  5. Know you have a team to back you up
  6. Support your team
  7. Believe in the core values of your company and share the same philosophy with your team
  8. Be accountable to yourself and the team
  9. Be self-aware
  10. Know your capabilities
  11. Keep yourself motivated
  12. Have a boss who gives you constant encouragement and advice
  13. Lead by example
  14. Have the mindset of being your own boss (especially in a remote business model like Artisan Creative’s)
  15. Have good communication skills with both internal and external stakeholders
  16. Understand that things aren’t always black and white
  17. Compromise when needed
  18. Don’t be afraid of having difficult conversations 
  19. Sometimes you need to just pick up the phone to get your point across (emails and/or text can get lost in translation)
  20. Follow-up, follow-up, follow-up…
  21. Control what you can control and what you can’t–move on
  22. First impressions are lasting impressions
  23. Stress can be managed. It’s not the end of the world 
  24. Be true to yourself, know your limitations and stick with it
  25. Finally, life is so much better when you are laughing.

If you need help with recruitment to hire a position on your team, reach out to Margaret. You’ll see what we mean.

Thank you, Margaret, for an amazing 25 years. Here’s to creating even more impact and new relationships in 2020 and beyond.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 557th issue of our a.blog.

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