Artisan Blog

7 Apps That Will Make Job Searching Easier

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

job-search-apps

If you’re on-the-go or want to search for a job away from your laptop/desktop, you’ll probably find it more efficient to download one of these amazing job searching apps.

In today’s job market, the competition is higher than ever. To stay on top of the latest job opportunities, you need to maintain that competitive edge. That means having constant access to professional networks so you can quickly make connections and send out resumes on the fly.

Here are seven great apps that will help make your job hunt that much easier beyond the usual suspects:

Indeed: One of the most powerful job search aggregators, this app collects job openings from all major search engines and job boards, listing them into a convenient location for you to peruse. You can narrow your search and save specific searches (e.g. “social media coordinator”) to see if there’s anything new.

LinkedIn: An essential app, LinkedIn’s app lets you access your professional network and job search in a flash. You can stay up-to-date with groups and share content, thus helping increase your job opportunities. Pro Tip: We’re on LinkedIn -- and we have links to daily job postings!

Switch: Think of Switch like a dating app for jobs. Swipe right if you’re interested in the opportunity, or left if you’re not. Hiring managers can do the same to you, giving you a “yay” or “nay” on your job profile. If you both connect, you’ll be able to network and chat directly about the position.

ZipRecruiter: Much like other job board sites, their app offers more potential job options. Save your resume in your mail, DropBox, Google Drive, or browser so you can quickly apply, or set up job alerts for certain companies and job postings.

Pocket Resume: If you need to fix your resume fast, this app lets you craft one directly on your phone. The PDF rendering technology sorts through layout and design for you, and lets you store and sent from your device. This works especially well if you need send resumes during peak working hours.

BeKnown: Launched by Monster.com, this app works with your Facebook timeline to create a career identity on Facebook so you can share professional and educational experience without revealing your current timeline or friend network and interactions. You can recommend colleagues and companies, or collect with alumni to see if someone from your school is hiring!

Anthology (formerly Poachable): For those who are looking for a new job, but already have a job, this app allows you to connect with hiring managers in secret. Fill out a detailed questionnaire, then let the algorithm match you with employers. If both of you are interested, they’ll send an email introduction.

Artisan Creative has new jobs in creative and digital fields all the time! Check out our the page or find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest, or subscribe to our RSS feed to see what new jobs in marketing, copywriting, graphic design, UX/UI design, illustration, project management, and more pop up!


9 Things to Avoid During a Job Interview

Wednesday, April 06, 2016

tips-avoid-job-interview

Interviews necessitate that you make a good impression, however nerves or being unprepared can hold you back from presenting yourself in the best light. Other factors can also erode confidence such as what you're wearing, when you arrive, or whether you're focused, present and actually listening to your interview. Here are nine things to avoid during any job interview.

  1. Being unprepared. Anticipate questions about your resume and experience, and have answers for the most common interview questions. Do your research to get an idea of company culture, products and where your skills may translate. A quick search of the company’s website and social media channels will prepare you.

  2. Forgetting your manners. There are simple things you can do to solidify your impression as a thoughtful and considerate person this company wants to hire. Arrive on time, say thank you, be respectful to all and have a positive attitude.

  3. Unprofessional attire. Is your outfit wrinkled or messy? A sloppy ensemble signals to your interviewer that you didn’t care enough to notice the details. Have a couple of alternative outfits picked out in case your normal go-to outfit has something wrong, and always make sure all of your interview outfits are pressed and ready to go.

  4. Discussing salary. Best not to discuss salary in a first interview. Only discuss it if the interviewer asks you about it first.  Otherwise best to focus on the role and company culture and discuss salary in  follow-up interviews. If you are working with a recruiter, they will have shared your parameters ahead of time, so leave the negotiation to your recruiter.

  5. Not listening. What is your interviewer asking you? If you're not paying attention and either answer the wrong question or ask them to repeat it, you imply that your attention span or attention to detail is low. Show that you can follow directions and keep an open mind by simply listening.

  6. Rambling, fidgeting, or getting too nervous. Yes, interviews can be nerve wracking, but you're here to show you are best for this job. When you go on and on, elaborating on every answer, you're supplying too much information and offering irrelevant anecdotes. On the other hand, freezing up is equally bad! If you think you could get nervous, practice your answers beforehand in the mirror so you’ll feel confident in the room.  Be concise, articulate and to the point.

  7. Putting down a former boss or company. Even if your former employer was a nightmare for you to work with, nothing will make you look worse than speaking ill about them. You also never know who knows who! If a previous job situation was truly terrible, practice explaining what didn't work for you in that position in a positive way.

  8. Answering your phone. Turn off your cell phone and put it away while you're interviewing. Picking it up when it buzzes might be instinct that shows the interviewer you can't focus, or you care more about what someone texted you than this job opportunity.

  9. Being late. ABOT: Always Be On Time. If you don't know where the company is, map it out before driving (or taking public transit or an Uber) so you know how long it'll take to get there and can plan accordingly. If there is an outstanding situation for being late, like a car accident or a sick child, have the hiring manager's phone number on dial so you can call and let them know what's going on.

Are you a hiring manager, or a long-time job interviewee? What are your tips on what to avoid in a job interview? Tell us on Twitter!


Why Thank You Notes Are Important

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

thank-you-notes-important

Receiving a handwritten note is very special. Yet the art of the thank-you note has somewhat disappeared over the course of the last couple of generations. While thank-you notes are an opportunity to connect with people in a meaningful way, digital continues to trump pen and paper.

However the handwritten thank-you note says a lot about who you are, and sends the message you care enough about the medium to invest yourself in writing down your gratitude on paper. It's proper etiquette, of course, but it's also about recognizing what other people have gien you. Consider how you would feel if someone sent you a thank-you note, whether it was for a gift, an hour of your time, or your effort. Why not pass on that good feeling to someone else? 

Start by having supplies on hand. You never know when you’ll get a gift from a client or friend, when a job interview will necessitate one, or when someone surprises you! Have stationery that reflects your personality and keep a roll of stamps handy. Second, make the time. All you need is a few sentences, so take out 10 minutes in your day to express your appreciation for their actions. Then seal up the envelope, put it in the mailbox, and ta-da! You’ve spent a minute wisely showing gratitude beyond an email or text.

Sending a digital thank you, like an email, within 24 hours of your interview is considered good manners and a second best option to the printed kind. However, when possible, follow-up with a personalized thank you to make a difference and get the hiring manager’s attention one last time. Use this time to thank the interviewer for the opportunity, and reiterate ideas you might have discussed during the interview. Keep it brief and to the point. It's about showing your appreciation, not networking. 

Saying “thanks”, no matter the circumstance or medium conveys to others you are thoughtful and grateful and is simply the right thing to do.


Your Interviewing Style

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

Just like no two snowflakes are alike, no two interviews are exactly the same. That being said, there are several archetypes of interviewers. Personality, company culture, and interview style play a big role in how a job interview goes, and there are many things that can contribute to a good or bad interview, such as whether the candidate is prepared, reading body language, and sussing out if they are indeed qualified for the position. But you -- and the candidate -- can help each other have a successful interview by knowing what type of interviewer you are.

The Talkative Interviewer

You’re friendly and warm! You love talking about the company you love working for, and have a lot to say about the position. You may also have a lot to say...in general. Toe the line between gregarious and chatty by keeping your guard up. Let the candidate do more of the talking, and be an active listener. The more they talk, the more you’ll be able to determine if they’re really a good fit for the team.

The Inquisitive Interviewer

You feel that the best way to get to know people is to ask questions. You’re likely to ask a candidate about aspects of their life beyond their career accomplishments or future goals. Some personal questions are fine to ask. For instance, if they made a personal connection to your company’s work in their cover letter, it’s fine to explore this. However, you should never ask any questions that could be construed as inappropriate or make someone feel uncomfortable. If they’re a good fit for the company, you’ll get to know them better later.

The Questioning Interviewer

You like to get down to business. You don’t just ask a lot of questions -- you ask them rapidly and expect the candidate to fire back just as quickly. While you may feel this is an efficient form of interviewing, your candidate may find it a little intimidating. Switch up the pace of the interview and allow them time to formulate thoughtful answers.

The “Follows the Script” Interviewer

You’re fair and objective. You also have a job to do, and that job is to find the best new hire for the team. You have a pre-set list of questions you ask, and you don’t deviate too much from the script. While it may help you keep the candidates straight, be prepared for someone you’re interviewing to talk at length on one subject, or demonstrate passion for a specific achievement. Let the flow of discourse shift when necessary -- you may find that by doing so, you find your next hire faster!

The Busy Interviewer

You have a LOT on your plate. You’re leading the team, taking care of projects, answering emails -- maybe you don’t even really care that much about being a part of the interview process. But the candidate might be nervous, and not feigning interest in the interview can come off as rude. Try to set aside any distractions and listen to them, especially because they could very well be working for you soon.

The Funny Interviewer

You’re a joker. You like to have fun and laugh, and you want a team that does the same. Yet sarcasm or jokes might cross the line. An anxious candidate might not know how to react to your humor, or even share it. Try to focus on their resume, and if you think they’re too serious, then you can make another choice later.

The New Interviewer

You’re fairly new to the company or your team. In fact, this might be the first time you’ve had the responsibility of hiring someone! But being new means you don’t have the same level of experience as other folks. Prepare in advance of the interview. Have a list of questions ready and their resume printed out for reference. Think of what questions they may ask you about the job or company, and have replies ready for them.

Are you looking for talent at your company? Tell us what you’re looking for so we can help!


How to Network on LinkedIn

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

networking-linkedin

In terms of networking for business, LinkedIn is the clear winner. Whether you want to recruit talent, grow your personal brand, explore interesting content, or find job opportunities for yourself, LinkedIn enables you to build a powerful network of professionals. However, you have to know how to network in order to make the most of it. Here are some tried and true best practices for growing -- and keeping -- your LinkedIn network healthy and happy.

Treat your profile like a snapshot of your professional life. This is your first LinkedIn impression, make it a good one!  Add relevant and current job information. Post an appropriate profile image. Much like your resume, portfolio, or social media accounts, use it to put your best foot forward.

Get people to recommend you! The best people to endorse you are those that have actually worked with you. They’ll be able to speak about your skills and experience in glowing terms and with specificity that can’t be matched by tenuous LinkedIn connections.

Recommend others! Writing valid and relevant recommendations for other people will help you get back in touch with colleagues who you could connect with later. Besides, it’s a nice thing to do! Remember the golden rule!

Ask for connections from people you know. Former colleagues, old friends, and new acquaintances all build towards a great network. However asking for connections from strangers won’t help much. If you don’t know them, explain why they should want to connect with you with a personal message crafted just for them instead of a standard one.

Be part of groups -- but choose carefully. Being part of a LinkedIn group can help you join up with other professionals in your area, or connect with others in your business. Pick groups that are most relevant to your interest, and stay active by posting introspective responses to interesting discussions. Leave the ones that don’t lead anywhere or aren’t fulfilling.

Contribute to more than yourself. Starting a discussion or posting a link should give value to your profile, your groups, and the community at large. You want to relate to and identify with your network. Don’t just use LinkedIn for self promotional purposes.

Relationships, including online ones, take time to develop. If you want to become closer with someone via LinkedIn, then invest time. Setup a professional meetup to talk shop, or find out what common ground you have based on your profiles. What can you offer these connections? How can they reciprocate?

Are you following Artisan Creative on LinkedIn? Get the latest job updates, exclusive content, and more!


Are You Overqualified for That Job?

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Have you ever been told you were told you were “overqualified” for a job?

Overqualified?! What does that mean? Can someone really have too much experience? Surely that must be a positive thing, right?

When a job seeker is considered overqualified, it means there is not a right match between the available position and that person’s experience level. For example…

  • The candidate may have more experienced than the supervisor
  • The candidate’s experience may be intimidating to others on the team
  • The candidate’s years of experience may warrant a higher salary than the company is able to pay
  • The candidate may not be challenged by the job in the long run
  • The candidate may get bored and leave the role (this is a big reason why hiring managers are cautious of hiring someone with more experience than the role warrants)

However, you’ve worked hard to gain valuable experience you can apply in a myriad of roles. Your skills are likely transferable from one industry to another, especially in the creative industry, so if you are going to accept a role more junior than your skill level, be honest with yourself as to why you want this position.

And if you are truly interested in a specific role, even if you are more experienced than the job description indicates, then you can highlight your experience so it is an asset:

  • Update your resume to highlight relevant experience specific to this role
  • Write a cover letter that expresses why you’re genuinely interested and excited for the role, even if it seems like your career is further along than the position would require.  For example, if this allows you to learn a new industry, or learn a new skill
  • Highlight how your experience can be an asset and help the team or manager

Keep in mind that your resume and cover letter are just tools to help you stand out among a sea of candidates also applying for the same position. Once you are granted an interview, the real work begins.

Looking for work? Make sure to follow us on social media and check out our open job listings for freelance and full time roles in a variety of industries!


10 Best Practices for Your Resume

Wednesday, January 06, 2016

10 Best Practices for Your Resume


We’ve talked at length about the things to include on your resume. However there are  just as many things to avoid if you want to land an interview. Given that you’ve a mere few  seconds to impress a hiring manager, your resume needs to stand out! Here are 10 things to eliminate from on your resume in order to highlight your work experience, skills, education, and achievements to be distinctive:

1. Objectives. These descriptions at the top of a resume not only feel antiquated, but they don’t add anything to your resume. Moreover, they focus on what want rather than what you can offer to the company. If you feel this job is the best next step for your career, talk about it in your cover letter.

2. Photos. Unless you’re auditioning for a TV pilot or modeling gig, don’t include your photos.  Chances are your online portfolio, website, or LinkedIn profile already includes your photo.

3. Subjective traits. You may feel you possess amazing leadership skills or are an innovative thinker in design, however employers ignore these subjective traits because they can’t be measured. Instead, focus on objective facts and metrics If you really are an amazing leader, include how many team members you’ve managed, or include a quick example in your cover letter explaining how you’ve led your team to success, or achieved ROI in a campaign.

4. More than one page. We’ve debated this, but the short answer is--either in OK.  It all depends on your work experience, whether you have been freelancing at multiple places or been at the same company for several years.  The key is to include relevant, accurate and current information.

5. Salary history. This is a major faux paus, as well as a bad idea, as it compromises your ability to negotiate for a higher salary later! Leave it off so you can have some negotiating power later.

6. Short-term jobs. You don’t want to come across as job-hopping, so make sure to emphasize freelance or contract in the job title.

7. Leave out overused words. Here’s just a sampling of words that are redundant and don’t give employers concrete information: capable, skillful, effective, hardworking, innovative, and motivated are all qualities they hope you already have without you having to say so. Instead, search for synonyms that more closely fit your personality. For instance, as an “effective” employee you “engage in creative tasks”.

8. “References Available Upon Request”. If an employer wants references, they will ask. Save precious resume space for other accomplishments rather than including this sentence at the bottom.

9. Education. If you’re just out of high school and applying to your first jobs, it makes sense to include the information. Otherwise, focus on college and graduate information as well as degrees earned.

10. Misspellings, grammar issues, and typos. We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again -- proofread, proofread, proofread! Nothing can make the resume  less professional than resume errors.  

A resume is a snapshot of your work experience -- not only should it be well written, it should highlight the best possible version of your experience and how you will be contributing to a new team. Take out irrelevant information, and polish up your resume so represents your experience in the best light possible.


Tips for Working With Recruiters To Find You a Great Job

Tuesday, December 08, 2015

Recruiters are here to support your job search, but it’s like they say in Jerry Maguire: “Help me, help you.” Here are some tips on how to work with recruiters so they can help you find the perfect role:

Recruiters have a good insight into a company’s open roles.  Recruiters are a great source of knowledge about openings in the industry.  They also have specific insight into what a hiring manager is looking for, so if you aren’t considered for a role, it’s because you’re not the best fit according to the hiring company’s needs.

Include an intro letter. A short email introduction highlighting your skills, leadership qualities and why you’re interested in the position is a good way to get yourself noticed. If you have a website or online creative portfolio, include the link.

Apply to local jobs. If a job posting includes the phrase “local candidates only” or something similar, the company needs an employee to start immediately or will not pay for relocation. Look for local jobs or wait to relocate before applying -- otherwise it will be a challenge for a recruiter to convince the hiring company you’re a great candidate.

Find positive spins for unemployment. If you’re currently unemployed, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. However, it’s always better if you can fill in the gaps.  Use your time to try consulting, working on freelance projects, taking a class, starting a blog, volunteering for a cause or organization you’re passionate about. Alternately, create samples for the types of jobs you want (like copywriting samples or mockups of websites).

Make it easy to find you. Let’s say you’re not the right candidate for a particular job, however you want to have your profile discoverable by future employers. Create a website or creative portfolio, social profile and samples so your recruiter can better promote your skills.

Trust the recruiter. Don’t contact the employer directly -- that’s why they hired a recruiter in the first place! Trust that they’re doing everything they can to put you in that great position. Moreover, recruiters are experienced, so if they advise something like fixes on your resume or an improved online portfolio it’s likely your chances of landing a great gig will increase!

Build a relationship. Even if a recruiter isn’t able to place you immediately or your find an ideal job on your own, maintain the relationship and check in on occasion. You never know when you can use their services again--either as a candidate or as a hiring manager.

Recruiters are invested in your success. As long as you know what you want and how you best fit into a job, then it’ll be easier for a recruiter to assist you. Follow these tips, and you’ll be on your way to a new job!


How Important Are the Requirements in a Job Description?

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

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Here at Artisan Creative, we read a lot of job descriptions. I mean, a lot of job descriptions! It’s part of what we do. And we also write a lot of job descriptions.

While we focus more exclusively on helping designers and creatives find jobs with our clients, job requirements in general seems to always sound like they’re difficult to meet! Whether it’s an entry-level copywriting position that needs two to three years of experiences, or a senior designer that needs over 10 years of management experience, job descriptions universally sound hard. Even if something sounds like an ideal fit for your background, there might be something else you’re not as familiar with, like a CMS system or Adobe Illustrator.

So, exactly how important is it that you meet every requirement in a job description? Well, it all depends on your experience level, your education, and special skills. Let’s explore further:

  • Experience: If a job listing needs someone with five to seven years of experience, they’re looking for someone who’s experienced. That means those with only one to two years of experience aren’t the best match. However, if you’ve got three or four years under your belt, plus some major accomplishments worth sharing, it might be worth exploring further.

  • Education: Among creatives, your degree can sometimes come second to your experience in the field. For instance, if you have five to seven years of graphic design experience but actually got a degree in English, it’s probably fine to apply. However, keep in mind that some companies do require a college degree. Please do list graduation dates and degrees received. If you’re in the middle of finishing a degree, you can always list your degree as “in progress” with an expected graduation date. This info is looked at during background checks, so be as clear as possible.

  • Skills: Those who have at least several years of experience have likely amassed a number of skills that are transferable from one industry to another. That said, sometimes the job description requires a specific background. If you have a background in fashion, it’s probably unlikely you’re a good fit for a job with an insurance client. Yet you might be a great candidate for a job in entertainment, even though it’s not exactly the same. Pay extra attention to required software skills such as Javascript or 3D Studio Max and highlight your skills in those specific areas.

Generally, a good rule of thumb is that if you meet 75 percent of the requirements listed in the job description, it’s worth applying or talking to your recruiter about your qualification. Your recruiter will have a better idea of a role’s "Must-Haves" versus the "Nice-to-Haves" and can share more insight about the requirements.

Remember, your resume needs to be proofread and highlight your previous responsibilities and achievements, while your cover letter must be effective. If you’re armed with these tools, you’ll be ready to apply to any job you’re qualified for!


Here’s How You Can Impress Recruiters with Your Resume in 6 Seconds.

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

impress-recruiters-6-seconds

A recent Harvard Business Review article pointed out that online job search site The Ladders says recruiters take about six seconds to look at a resume.

Six seconds! What can anyone reasonably do in six seconds?

Well, they can make a judgment call. And that’s what you can fix. Because as long as your resume is effective, you get a lot more than six seconds of someone’s time.

Spruce up your portfolio. Your resume may only get a few moments of time to make a mark, but a well crafted portfolio of your work can make all the difference. A great portfolio can help convince hiring managers that your work speaks louder than your resume, as well as make the connection between your work experience and actual creative endeavors.

Close the employment gaps. If you’ve been looking for a while, it can feel like the gap between jobs is just getting bigger. Volunteer, freelance, or create your own projects to add to the resume so the gaps lessen. Look for leadership roles to help enhance your standing.

Be selective. Your resume is a body of content that represents you, so it doesn’t need to be comprehensive. Include whatever is relevant to the job and hiring manager as part of your experience. The same goes for your skills and accomplishments.

Format your resume correctly. Use bold and underlining plus bullet points to help promote yourself in a concise yet detailed fashion. Add the right keywords -- the more specific, the better. Short descriptions of previous work experience will suffice. Make sure to point out your responsibilities in each position in addition to personal achievements. Education goes at the end. Finally, keep everything clean! Lots of white space helps your resume appear professional and polished.

Ask for help. Being objective about your career can be difficult. Some people overestimate or underestimate their success. Hire a resume writer, or ask a mentor or friend to help with the resume writing process.

Take your time. Creating an effective resume is not a quick or easy process. You have to think carefully about what you want to say and how to say it.

Is your resume ready for review in six seconds? What are your resume tips?



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