Artisan Blog

9 Things to Avoid During a Job Interview

Wednesday, April 06, 2016

tips-avoid-job-interview

Interviews necessitate that you make a good impression, however nerves or being unprepared can hold you back from presenting yourself in the best light. Other factors can also erode confidence such as what you're wearing, when you arrive, or whether you're focused, present and actually listening to your interview. Here are nine things to avoid during any job interview.

  1. Being unprepared. Anticipate questions about your resume and experience, and have answers for the most common interview questions. Do your research to get an idea of company culture, products and where your skills may translate. A quick search of the company’s website and social media channels will prepare you.

  2. Forgetting your manners. There are simple things you can do to solidify your impression as a thoughtful and considerate person this company wants to hire. Arrive on time, say thank you, be respectful to all and have a positive attitude.

  3. Unprofessional attire. Is your outfit wrinkled or messy? A sloppy ensemble signals to your interviewer that you didn’t care enough to notice the details. Have a couple of alternative outfits picked out in case your normal go-to outfit has something wrong, and always make sure all of your interview outfits are pressed and ready to go.

  4. Discussing salary. Best not to discuss salary in a first interview. Only discuss it if the interviewer asks you about it first.  Otherwise best to focus on the role and company culture and discuss salary in  follow-up interviews. If you are working with a recruiter, they will have shared your parameters ahead of time, so leave the negotiation to your recruiter.

  5. Not listening. What is your interviewer asking you? If you're not paying attention and either answer the wrong question or ask them to repeat it, you imply that your attention span or attention to detail is low. Show that you can follow directions and keep an open mind by simply listening.

  6. Rambling, fidgeting, or getting too nervous. Yes, interviews can be nerve wracking, but you're here to show you are best for this job. When you go on and on, elaborating on every answer, you're supplying too much information and offering irrelevant anecdotes. On the other hand, freezing up is equally bad! If you think you could get nervous, practice your answers beforehand in the mirror so you’ll feel confident in the room.  Be concise, articulate and to the point.

  7. Putting down a former boss or company. Even if your former employer was a nightmare for you to work with, nothing will make you look worse than speaking ill about them. You also never know who knows who! If a previous job situation was truly terrible, practice explaining what didn't work for you in that position in a positive way.

  8. Answering your phone. Turn off your cell phone and put it away while you're interviewing. Picking it up when it buzzes might be instinct that shows the interviewer you can't focus, or you care more about what someone texted you than this job opportunity.

  9. Being late. ABOT: Always Be On Time. If you don't know where the company is, map it out before driving (or taking public transit or an Uber) so you know how long it'll take to get there and can plan accordingly. If there is an outstanding situation for being late, like a car accident or a sick child, have the hiring manager's phone number on dial so you can call and let them know what's going on.

Are you a hiring manager, or a long-time job interviewee? What are your tips on what to avoid in a job interview? Tell us on Twitter!


Why Thank You Notes Are Important

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

thank-you-notes-important

Receiving a handwritten note is very special. Yet the art of the thank-you note has somewhat disappeared over the course of the last couple of generations. While thank-you notes are an opportunity to connect with people in a meaningful way, digital continues to trump pen and paper.

However the handwritten thank-you note says a lot about who you are, and sends the message you care enough about the medium to invest yourself in writing down your gratitude on paper. It's proper etiquette, of course, but it's also about recognizing what other people have gien you. Consider how you would feel if someone sent you a thank-you note, whether it was for a gift, an hour of your time, or your effort. Why not pass on that good feeling to someone else? 

Start by having supplies on hand. You never know when you’ll get a gift from a client or friend, when a job interview will necessitate one, or when someone surprises you! Have stationery that reflects your personality and keep a roll of stamps handy. Second, make the time. All you need is a few sentences, so take out 10 minutes in your day to express your appreciation for their actions. Then seal up the envelope, put it in the mailbox, and ta-da! You’ve spent a minute wisely showing gratitude beyond an email or text.

Sending a digital thank you, like an email, within 24 hours of your interview is considered good manners and a second best option to the printed kind. However, when possible, follow-up with a personalized thank you to make a difference and get the hiring manager’s attention one last time. Use this time to thank the interviewer for the opportunity, and reiterate ideas you might have discussed during the interview. Keep it brief and to the point. It's about showing your appreciation, not networking. 

Saying “thanks”, no matter the circumstance or medium conveys to others you are thoughtful and grateful and is simply the right thing to do.


Your Interviewing Style

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

Just like no two snowflakes are alike, no two interviews are exactly the same. That being said, there are several archetypes of interviewers. Personality, company culture, and interview style play a big role in how a job interview goes, and there are many things that can contribute to a good or bad interview, such as whether the candidate is prepared, reading body language, and sussing out if they are indeed qualified for the position. But you -- and the candidate -- can help each other have a successful interview by knowing what type of interviewer you are.

The Talkative Interviewer

You’re friendly and warm! You love talking about the company you love working for, and have a lot to say about the position. You may also have a lot to say...in general. Toe the line between gregarious and chatty by keeping your guard up. Let the candidate do more of the talking, and be an active listener. The more they talk, the more you’ll be able to determine if they’re really a good fit for the team.

The Inquisitive Interviewer

You feel that the best way to get to know people is to ask questions. You’re likely to ask a candidate about aspects of their life beyond their career accomplishments or future goals. Some personal questions are fine to ask. For instance, if they made a personal connection to your company’s work in their cover letter, it’s fine to explore this. However, you should never ask any questions that could be construed as inappropriate or make someone feel uncomfortable. If they’re a good fit for the company, you’ll get to know them better later.

The Questioning Interviewer

You like to get down to business. You don’t just ask a lot of questions -- you ask them rapidly and expect the candidate to fire back just as quickly. While you may feel this is an efficient form of interviewing, your candidate may find it a little intimidating. Switch up the pace of the interview and allow them time to formulate thoughtful answers.

The “Follows the Script” Interviewer

You’re fair and objective. You also have a job to do, and that job is to find the best new hire for the team. You have a pre-set list of questions you ask, and you don’t deviate too much from the script. While it may help you keep the candidates straight, be prepared for someone you’re interviewing to talk at length on one subject, or demonstrate passion for a specific achievement. Let the flow of discourse shift when necessary -- you may find that by doing so, you find your next hire faster!

The Busy Interviewer

You have a LOT on your plate. You’re leading the team, taking care of projects, answering emails -- maybe you don’t even really care that much about being a part of the interview process. But the candidate might be nervous, and not feigning interest in the interview can come off as rude. Try to set aside any distractions and listen to them, especially because they could very well be working for you soon.

The Funny Interviewer

You’re a joker. You like to have fun and laugh, and you want a team that does the same. Yet sarcasm or jokes might cross the line. An anxious candidate might not know how to react to your humor, or even share it. Try to focus on their resume, and if you think they’re too serious, then you can make another choice later.

The New Interviewer

You’re fairly new to the company or your team. In fact, this might be the first time you’ve had the responsibility of hiring someone! But being new means you don’t have the same level of experience as other folks. Prepare in advance of the interview. Have a list of questions ready and their resume printed out for reference. Think of what questions they may ask you about the job or company, and have replies ready for them.

Are you looking for talent at your company? Tell us what you’re looking for so we can help!


Interview Preparation Tips for Anyone in Any Creative or Design Job

Wednesday, October 07, 2015

interview-prep-creatives

Your resume is perfect. Your cover letter is amazing. However without a strong interview or without research and preparation, it can be a challenge to find your next perfect role. Here’s our quick guide to prepping yourself for any job interview, for any company, at any point in your career:

Do your research. No matter the company, become familiar with it before the interview. Understand the job description and what they’re looking for. Read over the mission of the company, as well as other company details. Are you interviewing for a position with a large digital agency that works mostly with fashion clients, or with a up-and-coming startup that needs someone who falls in line with their values? Does this company have product lines or do they offer services?

Anticipate questions. Come up with appropriate answers and practice them before the interview so you can be prepared. Align yourself with the prospective employer. Moreover, come up with 2-3 questions you want to ask about the team, the role or the company.  Do not ask questions about the salary, vacations and other benefits in the first interview.

Consider image. Dress for the part—even if it’s a video interview. Wear what will best fit in with the culture and expectations of the company. You can always ask what that is before the interview, but it’s always safe to aim for business casual with a creative touch.

Remember nonverbal messaging. What you say without saying anything can make a big impact. Offer a firm handshake and stand tall. Pay attention to eye contact, tone of voice, posture, and gestures.

Keep your responses concise. Don’t ramble about a particular achievement when you can sum it up in a few sentences. Don’t talk over the interviewer. If they ask for more explanation, talk a little more, but your answers should still be to the point.   

Know your metrics! Back up your answers with quantifiable data. Instead of mentioning how you grew a company’s social media presence to “a lot more”, make mention of how a specific Twitter campaign helped increase followers by 25 percent. Alternately, offer examples of your leadership skills with numbers. You weren’t just a manager -- you were the manager of a 12-person team who helped the company succeed with innovative and collaborative ideas, or you managed X number of presentations.

Know your key strengths and repeat them. Don’t brag, but do praise yourself and your accomplishments. It’s essential to confidently articulate what you’re best at doing! It also helps the interview know whether you’re a great fit for the job.  

Share your success stories. Oftentimes, interviewers ask about a project you were proud of or a role where you had to overcome adversity on the job. Reflect on your past jobs and write out a few times you set out to execute a campaign, presentation, or idea, and how you were able to demonstrate your skills.  For example share how you won a pitch, achieved ROI, or reduced redundancy.

Visualize.  Can you see yourself as part of the team or company?  Use "we" vs. "them" as you discuss questions or specifics about a role. It helps to “see” yourself in that setting.

Bring your portfolio. Having a physical (or virtual, if you bring your laptop or tablet) representation of your work to show off your technical or design skills, as well as past projects. This will also help you explain those success stories in further detail.

Good luck on your next interview!  


Best Practices for Video and Phone Interviews

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

video-phone-interviews

Interviews can already be a nerve wracking ordeal, and telephone and video interviews can be as uncomfortable as in-person interviews. Yet they’re a great "first step" in many interview processes, especially for candidates who are in another location. Screening calls can be one-on-one, or with a committee. Either way, the same rules apply as in-person interviews: make your best impression. 

Telephone Interview Tips

Here’s how to prep yourself telephone interviews:

  • The criteria is not the same as an in-person interview. Instead of eye contact, you’re using your voice and its tone to communicate how you feel.

  • Talk concisely. Your experience, accomplishments, and achievements are worth celebrating, but you don’t need to launch into a diatribe about each one. Clear and short responses will do just fine, and keep the interviewer engaged.

  • Be friendly! Just like an in-person interview, you want to convey enthusiasm. Smile over the phone. When you smile, they’ll hear it!

  • If there’s dead air during the conversation, use the moment to ask a prepared question. Find out about the company’s culture or more about the team.

  • Listen closely. Without body language cues, you’ll have to engage in active listening to “hear” between the lines. Take notes if it helps, and concentrate on what they tell you about responsibilities and expectations.

  • Don’t discuss salary or benefits. You’re talking to them to connect about the basics of the job. If you get into second and third interviews, then consider talking about it.

  • Make sure you are in a quiet place without technology or connection issues.

Video Interview Tips

Likewise, video interviews via Skype, Zoom, Facetime or Google Hangout come with their own best practices.  Here’s how to prep:

  • Practice questions before the interview. Have a friend talk to you via video so you can work out any tech kinks in advance.

  • Look at the camera! If you look at the screen, you’re not making eye contact. Remember to apply in-person interview eye contact to a video one as well.

  • Dress like you’re meeting the interviewer in person.

  • Make sure your space is well lighted. If you’re in a darker room, move a lamp nearby so they can see your face.

  • Pay close attention to what is being displayed on the wall behind you.  Ensure you have clean, professional backdrop.

  • Keep up the pace. Like on the phone, you want brief and memorable answers to their questions. Be mindful of how long it takes you to respond, and be aware of the time.

  • Confirm timezones, especially if you are in a different timezone that the other person.

  • Be mindful of tech issues. Check your microphone and Internet connection prior to the interview start.

  • For creative roles, you may need to screen share and show your portfolio. Be prepared with a clean, uncluttered desktop and have your portfolio ready to go!

What are your tried and true interview tips?


Job Search: Research and Development Part II

Wednesday, July 01, 2015

In the second of our two-part series, Artisan Creative's President Katty Douraghy talks about how to develop your brand in order to have a successful job search.

The Development phase of the R&D process includes developing your brand. 

Start with Social Media. 

  • Employers do check it out. 
  • Learn how to control your privacy settings, so keep your private information private!
  • Depending on your industry, set up your appropriate social channels, join groups or start adding relevant content.

LinkedIn is a powerful tool

  • Update your profile and work history
  • Join industry groups
  • Expand your network and connections
  • Get recommendations
  • Participate in discussion boards, posts, or blogs to highlight your subject matter expertise

Develop Your Portfolio

  • If you are in the creative space, update your portfolio with recent, relevant samples.
  • Organize your samples by focus whether it’s digital, print, broadcast, or mobile.
  • Detail your involvement (whether it’s concepting, executing, production) and remove the guesswork for Hiring Managers.
  • Be specific if it was produced work, or comps or a class project
  • If you don’t have web skills to create your own custom portfolio, then use the several online portfolio tools that are available. 
  • The key is to be current, relevant and organized in the flow of presentation of your work.

Next, Develop your resume.

  • Write, edit and proof it.  Did I mention to please proof your resume?  ◦A typo can quickly derail everything!
  • Besides using spell check, Read YOUR RESUME OUT LOUD and enunciate words to catch errors! 
  • Have someone else read your resume with a fresh set of eyes. 
  • Remove the guesswork from your resume. ◦Be specific with your work dates. Clearly state the months and years. 
  • Indicate contract or freelance assignments, otherwise it can be viewed as job hopping.
  • Highlight your relevant work history
  • Use keywords, specific job titles, software programs, and certifications. Many online job application portals search and scan for keywords.
  • Use brief, concise bullets or phrases
  • Education: List graduation dates and completed degrees.  

Next, practice your interviewing skills, especially if it’s been awhile

  • Practice in front of the mirror
  • Practice with a friend
  • Do an interview prep with your recruiter
  • Record yourself and listen to your voice, tone, filler words
  • Join Toastmasters or other public speaking forums to practice your presentation   

The better your R&D phase in setting up the strategy for the job search, the more tactical you can be in your approach. 

Leave the guesswork and haphazard approach to your competition—and plan your success to stand out from the crowd.

View Part I here 

 


Job Interviews: Questions to Ask During an Interview

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Job Interviews: Questions to Ask During an Interview

 

You’ve found the perfect job, sent your resume to the company and you’ve been invited for an interview. Now what?


We recommend that you prepare by reading our blog on the six things you should be doing during your interview and then start thinking about a few questions to ask the interviewer to help you learn more about the company and the role for which you are interviewing.
Sometimes the answers to these questions, and the way in which they are answered, can provide you with vital insight into whether an opportunity is really the right fit.
It’s perfectly acceptable to write down interview questions and refer to your notepad during an interview, in fact we encourage you to do so as it shows you’ve really prepared for your interview and given thought to your questions.

Questions about the Role / Position / Department
•    How would you describe the work environment?
•    Can you describe a typical day?
•    Can you share more about the department and the team I would be working with?
•    How do you envision this department in 6 months / 1 year / long-term?
•    How large is the department (how many designers, marketers, etc.)?
•    What is the hierarchy/org chart when it comes to decision-making in my dept?
•    What have been some of the most exciting projects we’ve worked on?
•    What was your personal favorite project here?
•    What are your expectations for this position?
•    What is the growth potential of this role?

Questions about the Company Culture / History
•    What is your history with this company?
•    Can you share more about the company culture?
•    Can you share more about the company history and/or clients?
•    What is the hierarchy/org chart when it comes to decision-making in the company?
•    How would you define the management philosophy of this company?
•    How do you envision the company in 6 months / 1 year / long-term?

Questions about your Skills / Qualification
•    What is most important for you in this position in terms of skills and personality?
•    What qualities do you feel someone needs to be successful in this role?
•    What metrics for success do you implement?
•    What makes someone a top producer in your eyes?
•    What in particular in my background made you feel I was a good fit for this position?
•    Do you have any concerns about my experience?
•    What do you foresee any challenges for me in this role?
•    Is there anything you feel is missing from my background/resume that I may be able to expand on?

•    How can I grow my skills in this position?

At the end of your interview, don’t forget to ask our favorite question which is “Do you have any reservations about hiring me?” This is your final chance to sell yourself one last time and also iron out any concerns the interviewer may have about your experience.

Do you have any go-to interview questions you like to ask? How do you prepare for your interviews? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below or on Twitter @artisanupdates.

 


Artisan Spotlight: Amazing Talent - Nina

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Artisan Spotlight: Amazing Talent - Nina

“To thrive in 21st century business we need to be willing to shed our own skin, think more creatively and strategically, be collaborative and reinvent ourselves to change with the times.”

Artisan Spotlight is a new monthly feature dedicated to the amazing talent we work with. This is an opportunity for you, the talent, to share your career experiences and impart your knowledge and advice to others. Want to be featured here? Get in touch!

This month we spoke to Nina. We met Nina back in late 2013 at a networking event and have worked with her ever since. Nina works in Brand, Digital and Marketing Communications Strategy and specializes in strategically building brands to engage their audiences, start movements and increase their revenue and growth.

Why did you decide to shift from corporate to creative?

I started to observe and experience patterns in the corporate world, both when I was an employee and as a consultant. One being that all of the innovation, strategy and ideas, and creative thinking and design were being outsourced to creative firms and agencies and not coming from inside the organization (nor was it being asked of the internal teams).  There was also a pattern of downsizing the internal teams and those who were left were being tasked to function as project managers vs. strategic thinkers. 

I’m a visionary, strategist and creative thinker and while I was hired into companies for those talents, I found myself being pigeon-holed into being solely a project manager and becoming less valued for what I actually provided. I thrive in creative environments where I can invent and discover new and innovative ways to communicate and reach audiences. I found myself withering on the vine and becoming less engaged and enlivened by my career and utterly uninspired.

Some deep self-exploration had me start to identify these things and create a new vision for my career and the experience I was looking for.  Based on what I identified as important and my own personality and skill set; tech-start ups and creative agencies became the playground I was interested in playing in.  Their approach to business and creative problem solving is more aligned with mine.  I’ve discovered that I’m really a creative who knows business.

What were your biggest challenges during this time?

Shifting my own mindset

I had to stop thinking like a corporate person to create solutions and strategy and start thinking like someone in a small growing business and what their challenges might be and how they might approach creating a Brand/Marketing Communications strategy and execute it with smaller resources.  I also had to set aside what I “already thought I knew” to step into the unknown and be willing to relearn and upgrade my own operating system.   Disrupting one’s belief system and mindset takes something…and is probably the most important step in making a career change.

Saying No to what I didn’t want

The only work that was coming my way at first was corporate work and I knew that to truly make that shift, I had to close the door on my corporate life.  I started saying no to corporate opportunities. Which was very scary because that was the only income I had known and I was turning down work.  For a short time, no work was coming my way. 

Not giving up

I questioned my choices, particularly when I saw the drop in income…or at times no income.  But I knew that I had to follow my heart or I’d continue to live an uninspired life where my career was concerned.

How do the corporate and creative worlds differ?

The biggest difference that I see is that the creative world has the ability to be more agile and nimble.  There is a perspective of “let’s try this and maybe we’ll be wrong and fail, but let’s try and see what we learn, then we can reinvent.”  I’m also finding that in the creative and start-up worlds there is a 21st century approach to doing business that is collaborative, transparent and open to exploring partnership opportunities, even with companies and products that might be considered competitors.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to move into creative?

Be willing to completely reinvent yourself

Start from within. Study, learn, set aside what you know for awhile to learn something new…step outside of your own box…you can then incorporate what you already know into what you are learning.  Learn as much as you can, network and meet as many people as you can in the area you want to move into.

Surrender your ego over to your vision

Be willing to take a lesser position, less income or take a career step back to move into a new direction. Be willing to learn something new and have a beginner’s mind, no matter how experienced you are.  I have a friend who did that in his own career.  He’s now the CEO of the company he “took a step back” to join.

Don’t get discouraged

Keep the faith. Believe in your self. Keep moving forward and you will get there.


What's next for you?

I’m interested in moving away from consulting and creating a full time opportunity with a start-up or creative firm located on the West side.  I’d really like to make the investment and work with one company that is in a growth mode and help them fulfill on their vision. 

"Believe in yourself, keep moving forward and close the door behind you and take consistent action towards you vision, you will get to where you are going."

 

 If you are interested in booking Nina for an assignment, get in touch.

 


Meeting Recruiters: 5 Reasons to Meet Your Recruiter before a Job Interview

Wednesday, February 04, 2015

Meeting Recruiters: 5 Reasons to Meet Your Recruiter before a Job Interview

 


At Artisan Creative we aim to meet every candidate interviewing with our clients. It's a crucial part of the hiring process for both the client and the candidate (and our team at Artisan). It's also an opportunity to get to know one another better and build long-term relationships. We've been in the business for over 20 years so long-lasting relationships mean a lot to us.

Inside Scoop
It's a great feeling walking into an interview feeling prepared and confident. If you are working with a recruiter they should give you the inside scoop and the who's who of the company along with who you'll be meeting. They should set your expectations for culture fit, dress code, number of interviewers etc. ahead of time.  No one appreciates surprises -- especially on interview day. Your recruiter should prepare you for your best interview possible.

Beyond a Job Description

Job descriptions may tell you the requirements of the job but they can't really tell you much more than that. There's a ton of information left off including lots of little details such as who's on the team, key projects and what are the company's future growth plans. Meeting with your recruiter before an interview will provide you with extra knowledge, especially if your recruiter has a long-term relationship with the client.

Relationships and Networking

Building a good working relationship with your recruiter is key.  A good recruiter can be a great asset in knowing the openings in the job market, knowing the must-have's of job requirements and being an advocate on your behalf. Building relationships with a recruiter will not only expand your network but save a lot of time, too.  A good recruiter can be a strong connector.

Culture Fit and Non-Verbal Communication

You can learn a lot about a person from their non-verbal communication. Meeting face-to-face allows people to connect and learn about your interests beyond your work experience. If you love craft beers and surfing and choose creative over corporate environments that may not shine through over the phone. We like to know about your interests and find an alignment with a client to make the perfect match.

Market Insight
The job market can be a volatile place. If you're looking to change jobs or start freelancing, recruiters can give you crucial market insight. We handle multiple job opportunities daily and can often help to give you our views on any changes that may occur within the industry.  


Laura Pell - Artisan Creative 

 


5 Online Courses to Make You More Marketable to Employers

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

5 Online Courses to Make You More Marketable to Employers


 

At Artisan we’re big fans of self-improvement and learning new skills which is why we’ve put together a list of our favorite online resources to expand your knowledge and make you more marketable to future employers.

Online courses are a perfect way to hone existing skills and build new ones if you don’t have the time or the money to do in-person workshops and lessons. The important thing to remember with online courses and discussing these with potential employers is that you must demonstrate how you used your newly-acquired skills e.g. “after learning X I then went on to create YZ.” Show that you can learn something on your own initiative and then apply it to something else. 

Excel
There aren’t many jobs we can think of in our industry that don’t require exposure to Excel at some point. While some may work in Excel day in and day out, if you don’t use it too often you can become rusty. “But I don’t use Excel!” we hear you scream. At some point, you probably will and nothing will win your employer over more than having someone on their team who can navigate their way around. Excel Is Fun is a comprehensive YouTube channel with over 2000 tutorials and clips led by Mike “excelisfun” Girvin, a business instructor. There’s also Reddit’s creation, Excel Exposure and Chandoo with extensive tutorials and advice.

Web Design
Udemy’s Introduction to Design course aims to teach you design principles and take you further than just using Photoshop. It’s free and includes over 12 lectures to bring you up to speed on design basics. If you want to take it one step further try Alison’s Applying Design Principles which is a more in-depth look at design including production and colors.

Languages
Learning languages doesn’t have to be about classrooms and textbooks when you have companies like Duolingo and Memrise. They both make language learning fun and entertaining by working with the theory that if you repeatedly learn, repeat and memorize a word, it will eventually stick. If you’ve just started working with a new client who is based in Europe, try impressing them on your next status call with your new-found vocabulary.

Photoshop
If you work in design, Photoshop should be second nature to you but perhaps you’re moving into a more creative role or you need to start file checking or updating documents. For just $19 you can take a 30+ hour course on Photoshop. This course aims to teach you the basics and beyond. If you’re looking for free courses, Adobe also offers a 13 hour introduction on how to quickly master Photoshop which we’re particularly fond of.

Programming
There are a huge amount of online courses for programming, it can be hard to know where to begin. If you’re looking to move into a pure development role, it’s best to look at intensive courses where you can be hands-on but if you’re wanting to expand your understanding and come to terms with the more technical side, an introductory course can be helpful. Code School is an interactive way to learn front end development. They teach you by doing, so you’re not just watching online tutorials but you’re putting what you learn into practice via lesson plans and coding challenges. They cover HTML, CSS, Responsive Design and much more. We also recommend Team Treehouse, too. With a beautiful interface and easy-to-understand modules, learning programming languages has never been easier.

Have you tried online courses before? Which of these courses is the most useful to you?

 

Laura Pell - Artisan Creative

 



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