Artisan Blog

7 Apps That Will Make Job Searching Easier

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

job-search-apps

If you’re on-the-go or want to search for a job away from your laptop/desktop, you’ll probably find it more efficient to download one of these amazing job searching apps.

In today’s job market, the competition is higher than ever. To stay on top of the latest job opportunities, you need to maintain that competitive edge. That means having constant access to professional networks so you can quickly make connections and send out resumes on the fly.

Here are seven great apps that will help make your job hunt that much easier beyond the usual suspects:

Indeed: One of the most powerful job search aggregators, this app collects job openings from all major search engines and job boards, listing them into a convenient location for you to peruse. You can narrow your search and save specific searches (e.g. “social media coordinator”) to see if there’s anything new.

LinkedIn: An essential app, LinkedIn’s app lets you access your professional network and job search in a flash. You can stay up-to-date with groups and share content, thus helping increase your job opportunities. Pro Tip: We’re on LinkedIn -- and we have links to daily job postings!

Switch: Think of Switch like a dating app for jobs. Swipe right if you’re interested in the opportunity, or left if you’re not. Hiring managers can do the same to you, giving you a “yay” or “nay” on your job profile. If you both connect, you’ll be able to network and chat directly about the position.

ZipRecruiter: Much like other job board sites, their app offers more potential job options. Save your resume in your mail, DropBox, Google Drive, or browser so you can quickly apply, or set up job alerts for certain companies and job postings.

Pocket Resume: If you need to fix your resume fast, this app lets you craft one directly on your phone. The PDF rendering technology sorts through layout and design for you, and lets you store and sent from your device. This works especially well if you need send resumes during peak working hours.

BeKnown: Launched by Monster.com, this app works with your Facebook timeline to create a career identity on Facebook so you can share professional and educational experience without revealing your current timeline or friend network and interactions. You can recommend colleagues and companies, or collect with alumni to see if someone from your school is hiring!

Anthology (formerly Poachable): For those who are looking for a new job, but already have a job, this app allows you to connect with hiring managers in secret. Fill out a detailed questionnaire, then let the algorithm match you with employers. If both of you are interested, they’ll send an email introduction.

Artisan Creative has new jobs in creative and digital fields all the time! Check out our the page or find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest, or subscribe to our RSS feed to see what new jobs in marketing, copywriting, graphic design, UX/UI design, illustration, project management, and more pop up!

Our Favorite Places to Get Work Done in San Francisco

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

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For those that work from home or have flexible office situations, it can be a nice option to try a new work location from time to time. We know the Bay Area is teeming with fabulous coffee shops and cafes that can offer a respite from the home office. Here are some picks to get work done in San Francisco while enjoying some tasty treats.

Coffee Bar (Mission): While the name might not stand out as special, the coffee sure does! (All the benas are sourced directly from local roaster Mr. Espresso.) Known for being a start-up hangout, this cafe is especially great for those who need to power through a work marathon. When you get hungry, grab some food from their full lunch menu.

Haus (Mission): This space offers Scandinavian minimalism and plenty of tables and chairs to accommodate all kinds of busy bees. Simple and elegant, Haus has coffee, tea, kombucha, and baked good. Best of all, on warmer days, you can work outside on the back patio with lots of seating.

Matching Half Cafe (Western Addition): Warm and charming, the floor-to-ceiling windows at this corner coffee shop lets in plenty of sun and serves pour-over Sightglass coffee, along with some lighter fare for breakfast and lunch. For those popping in towards the end of the work day, there’s local draft beer and wine, plus happy hour specials.

The Social Study (Fillmore): Vintage in its approach (exposed brick, pendant lighting, used books and globes scattered throughout for decor), this spot delivers on its name, making it a great place to study and socialize -- like, say, meet a co-worker to go over a project, or set up a meeting with a client after hours. Hip-hop, disco, funk, and every other groovy beat that gets piped in through the speakers keeps you pumped throughout the day.

Nook (Nob Hill): For those in need of a hearty breakfast or lunch to fuel them, this neighborhood cafe has plenty of good eats, from a well-known Caesar salad to their vegan German chocolate cake. Watch as the cable car rolls past the sidewalk seating, or come in later in the day when you need a break for their daily happy hour and finish up the work day with a delicious Sangria.

Java Beach Cafe (Outer Sunset): Why work from home when you can work by the beach? Simple coffee, bagel sandwiches, and surfer clientele keep this place busy, even if it might look a little dated by SF standards. Cozy and comfortable, you can take in the sand dune views and watch the sunset while you wrap up the remaining pieces on that project.

Where are your favorite San Francisco coffee shops and cafes to get work done?

How to Be Happier at the Office, Virtual or Not

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

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Although productivity, efficiency, and creativity are important ideas to nurture and improve upon in the workplace, so is your mental health. It’s as necessary to be personally and professionally happy as it is to draft the copy, pitch the design, or get the project done. How can you be happier at the office, whether you’re commuting or working from home?

In short spurts, stepping away from your desk and getting out is a good thing. Doodle, shoot some hoops, have a dance party, or play a videogame to clear your head for a moment.

Rock out. Music can definitely improve your mood. Keep your favorite songs on file, or cull multiple playlists so you always have your favorite tunes at the ready.

Meditate. This is an excellent way to clear your head and improve your mental and emotional state. Find a quiet place (or put on headphones) and take five minutes to breathe. You can also use apps like Headspace to help guide you.

Get some greenery. Find a pretty vase and stock up every so often on fresh flowers to brighten up the day. Or, try some small plants that can withstand office lighting, like bamboo.

Stock up on water and better snacks. While you may be tempted to eat free chips at the office or fill up your desk drawer with candy, we recommend lots of water throughout the day and high-nutrient snacks that will fuel you through the day to keep you feeling healthy, not sluggish.

Exercise before work. Getting in a run, swim, or some kind of cardio before you start your day can help improve your energy for the rest of the day.

Focus on gratitude. Identify three things daily that you’re grateful for. Doing so has shown to offer greater psychological and emotional benefits. Moreover, show yourself some kindness. Instead of listing major milestone achievements, keep a running tab of the tiny wins.

Be social. Connect and engage with your co-workers. invite them to a lunch or happy hour. Don’t let social awkwardness or anxiety get in the way -- you just might make a new friend!

Praise. Praising your co-workers won’t just make them feel better -- it’ll make you feel better, leading to an increase in empathy and decrease in stress. Write a note, give them credit in a meeting, or start team bonding traditions.

Want some inspiration for cool office spaces? Check out our Pinterest board!

9 Things to Avoid During a Job Interview

Wednesday, April 06, 2016

tips-avoid-job-interview

Interviews necessitate that you make a good impression, however nerves or being unprepared can hold you back from presenting yourself in the best light. Other factors can also erode confidence such as what you're wearing, when you arrive, or whether you're focused, present and actually listening to your interview. Here are nine things to avoid during any job interview.

  1. Being unprepared. Anticipate questions about your resume and experience, and have answers for the most common interview questions. Do your research to get an idea of company culture, products and where your skills may translate. A quick search of the company’s website and social media channels will prepare you.

  2. Forgetting your manners. There are simple things you can do to solidify your impression as a thoughtful and considerate person this company wants to hire. Arrive on time, say thank you, be respectful to all and have a positive attitude.

  3. Unprofessional attire. Is your outfit wrinkled or messy? A sloppy ensemble signals to your interviewer that you didn’t care enough to notice the details. Have a couple of alternative outfits picked out in case your normal go-to outfit has something wrong, and always make sure all of your interview outfits are pressed and ready to go.

  4. Discussing salary. Best not to discuss salary in a first interview. Only discuss it if the interviewer asks you about it first.  Otherwise best to focus on the role and company culture and discuss salary in  follow-up interviews. If you are working with a recruiter, they will have shared your parameters ahead of time, so leave the negotiation to your recruiter.

  5. Not listening. What is your interviewer asking you? If you're not paying attention and either answer the wrong question or ask them to repeat it, you imply that your attention span or attention to detail is low. Show that you can follow directions and keep an open mind by simply listening.

  6. Rambling, fidgeting, or getting too nervous. Yes, interviews can be nerve wracking, but you're here to show you are best for this job. When you go on and on, elaborating on every answer, you're supplying too much information and offering irrelevant anecdotes. On the other hand, freezing up is equally bad! If you think you could get nervous, practice your answers beforehand in the mirror so you’ll feel confident in the room.  Be concise, articulate and to the point.

  7. Putting down a former boss or company. Even if your former employer was a nightmare for you to work with, nothing will make you look worse than speaking ill about them. You also never know who knows who! If a previous job situation was truly terrible, practice explaining what didn't work for you in that position in a positive way.

  8. Answering your phone. Turn off your cell phone and put it away while you're interviewing. Picking it up when it buzzes might be instinct that shows the interviewer you can't focus, or you care more about what someone texted you than this job opportunity.

  9. Being late. ABOT: Always Be On Time. If you don't know where the company is, map it out before driving (or taking public transit or an Uber) so you know how long it'll take to get there and can plan accordingly. If there is an outstanding situation for being late, like a car accident or a sick child, have the hiring manager's phone number on dial so you can call and let them know what's going on.

Are you a hiring manager, or a long-time job interviewee? What are your tips on what to avoid in a job interview? Tell us on Twitter!


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