Artisan Blog

Interview Horror Stories

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Don’t let the spooky time of year dampen your interviews this month, because let’s face it, we all have at least one interview horror story to share. Whether it’s running late due to traffic, being under (or over) dressed or something as horrifying as being totally unprepared, we obviously want you to do your best. Take a read through our internal staff's pre-Artisan interview horror stories and advice so you can succeed at your next interview.

Dressed to Depress
“On my very first day of interviews in London to enter the recruitment world, I had 2 back-to-back interviews consisting of a very corporate recruitment firm directly followed by a digital agency. My recruiter only prepared me for the first interview, not the second. The interview took place in private members only bar, so of course I was dressed to impress. I went straight to my second interview wearing a suit, only to arrive at a super edgy agency surrounded by people in casual clothes. There was nothing more humiliating than being marched through the office with everyone staring at my formal attire. The interviewer (wearing jeans) asked why I was dressed in such a way – I did explain myself and felt incredibly uncomfortable.” – Laura Pell – Recruiter at Artisan Creative

It’s important to do your own research on office environments. To get a better sense of a company’s culture and employees, look at their social pages. More often than not, a company will post employee photos across Facebook, Twitter or Instagram so you should be able to gauge what to wear. It’s always better to dress up than dress down so make sure you’re well groomed and presentable. The most important factor to address is “do I feel comfortable in what I’m wearing?”

Fear of the Unknown

“In San Francisco circa 1999 I was trying to land a new job in tech recruiting and interviewed at a start-up. The interview itself wasn’t bad but I had failed to ask any questions about the company and their plans. I was so set on finding a new job so I went along with it and accepted. Three weeks after being hired, they downsized and cut my position along with several others. The company was lackadaisical and had no vetting or on-boarding process.” – Jamie Grossman – Recruiter at Artisan Creative

Many people in Jamie’s situation would do the same thing, but if you’re looking for a long-term commitment with a company, make sure you know they are invested in you, too. Do you know their three to five year plan? Have you asked the interviewer why they personally joined the company? Are they prepared with onboarding and what are their expectations? It’s important to cover as much as possible, so write your questions beforehand and leave with the knowledge and security that you’re making the right choice.

Ridiculous Requests

I once interviewed for a company specializing in hypoallergenic products. The job description clearly stated no strong perfumes so I made sure to skip my usual spritz that day.  When I arrived, they had me sit face to face with the main interviewer while an associate sat in the chair right next to me and proceeded to lean in and take a few deep breaths. She continued to do that for the next few minutes and then asked if I was wearing deodorant.  I said yes and apparently, the deodorant scent was too strong for their liking.  I guess for this role, it wasn't enough to look the part, you have to smell the part as well!” – Jen Huynh – Talent Sourcer at Artisan Creative

This request is uncommon and while we hope you won’t have to endure being sniffed at by interviewers, do heed any requests client’s make. They may ask you to fill in application forms, present portfolios or take a skills test. If you come unprepared, first impressions of your organizational skills will be duly noted!

We’d love to hear your interview horror stories. Do you have your own frightful story to share? Tweet us or share on our Facebook page.

 


How to Hire Creatives

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

 

Hiring qualified talent for creative roles (digital, marketing, UX or design) is an art unto itself.

In addition to reviewing resumes and looking for specific skills or years of experience, reviewing a portfolio and understanding the nuances in a creative’s work requires a unique talent. After all, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Here are 3 tips to consider when looking to hire creative talent and evaluating portfolios.

1. Concept or Execution

Are you looking for a conceptual creative or one who is more executional? A conceptual talent ideates, pushes the creative boundaries, comes up with new ideas, new campaigns and a way to challenge the status quo. This person may or may not have hands-on skills— as they concept and ideate, someone else may actually sit behind a computer to bring it to life and take it to the finish line.

An executional candidate is someone who is very hands-on still. They know all the design programs well, can take the big picture idea and apply it to a variety of formats and deliverables. They’re able to read between the lines, interpret the big idea and execute it across multiple media and channels.

In some instances, one person can have both strengths—or they may favor one over the other. Who do you need on your team?

2. Your Brand

When looking at a resume and comparing two design talent, both may have similar proficiency with design programs, both may have the same years of experience and both may seem like the ideal candidate…on paper. When reviewing creative talent, a portfolio must accompany the resume, and in many cases it holds more weight than the resume.

When you review portfolio links, you may notice one designer’s aesthetic is bright, colorful, fun and illustrative, while the other candidate is minimalistic and corporate with a clean UI design aesthetic.

Both are beautiful, which aesthetic fits best within your company brand?

3. The Portfolio and to How Navigate it

When reviewing a portfolio, it can be difficult to get the full picture. Designers often work in collaboration with others: art directors, illustrators, copywriters, production artists, developers and many other talented teammates

How can you best tell who was involved in the work you are reviewing?

If the information isn't clearly defined in the sample, ask for clarification to help you get the full picture.

Do you need help hiring creative talent? Connect with us.


One-Two-One Onboarding

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Best Practices for onboarding new hires and making them feel welcome


Working with a Recruiter in Your Job Search — Why it's a Good Decision

Wednesday, October 05, 2016

 


 

Artisan Creative is celebrating 20 years of creative staffing & recruiting. Over the years we've learned a lot and will share our experiences with you in our 20/20 series: 20 blogs celebrating 20 years of creative recruiting!Enjoy!

In this day of fast-paced applicant tracking systems and online job submission portals, getting feedback about your qualifications, or input on the job is often a challenge. Frankly,  it’s hard to know if anyone has even had a chance to review your submission.

As the automated world of online resume portals has become frustrating for many, you may want to consider working with a recruiter in your job search.

Below are 8 reasons why working with a recruiter is a good idea in your job search:

 

  1. A recruiter is a consultant acting on your behalf. They are as committed to finding you that perfect new role as you are. They are pro-actively advocating for you and thinking of new opportunities.
  2. A recruiter often understands the company culture and processes that would be much harder to find out on your own. Your own research can only go so far. Recruiters often provide details not listed on job descriptions.
  3. A recruiter can negotiate salary and benefits on your behalf, based on the parameters you have shared. They are also knowledgeable about a client or a specific role’s salary range and benefits offering so they can remove the guess work.
  4. When recruiters are engaged on a candidate search, resumes from recruiters go to the top of the pile (assuming your recruiter has a good relationship with the client).
  5. An extra set of professional eyes on your resume or portfolio is incredibly important (especially, when there are employment gaps or just to eliminate those typos). They can consult on needed edits or changes.
  6. A recruiter has access to opportunities not listed on job boards.
  7. Your recruiter can help you prepare for the interview when the time comes.
  8. A recruiter with a great reputation for representing outstanding talent adds value to your brand.

 

Having a recruiter on your team can be the difference between landing the perfect role and sitting home by yourself wishing for that great job. Consider signing up with a recruitment agency who places people in your area of expertise. You’ll be glad you did!

If you are looking for a role in the creative or marketing area, see how Artisan Creative can help.




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